“Shields Up” Cyber Threat Alert Issued for All U.S. Organizations

By Kathie McDonald-McClure

The United States Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA) has issued a Shields UpAlert for every organization in the United States. The Shields Up Alert states that, as a result of the Russian government’s use of cyber as a key component of asserting pressure on a country’s government, military and population, “[e]very organization in the United States is at risk from cyber threats that can disrupt essential services and potentially result in impacts to public safety.” The Shields Up Alert sets forth specific recommended actions for organizations to take, regardless of size, to:

  • Reduce the likelihood of a damaging cyber intrusion,
  • Quickly detect a potential intrusion,
  • Ensure the organization is prepared to respond to an intrusion, and
  • Maximize the the organization’s resilence to a destructive cyber incident.

Read the full Shields Up Alert here.

Senators Propose U.S. Cybersecurity Incident Notification Law

This post was originally published on July 21, 2021. See important “Update” below.

UPDATE: On March 15, 2022, President Biden signed H.R. 2471, the Consolidated Appropriations Act of 2022, which includes the Cyber Incident Reporting for Critical Infrastructure Act of 2022 (“The CIRCI Act”). The CIRCI Act, which appears as Division Y in H.R. 2471, has several elements proposed by the initial Senate Bill that was the subject of this article with some variations. CISA has 24 months to issue implementing regulations.

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In light of the escalation in ransomware and other cyber threats, a bi-partisan group of U.S. Senators has released a cybersecurity notification bill titled “Cyber Incident Notification Act of 2021.” Under the proposed bill, a “covered entity” would be required to report a “cybersecurity intrusion” or “potential cybersecurity intrusion” to the Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA) within 24 hours of confirmation of the intrusion.  Covered entities also would be required to submit updated cybersecurity threat information to CISA within 72 hours after the discovery of new information. The requirement for updates would continue until the incident is mitigated or any follow-up investigation is completed.

Although the term “cybersecurity intrusion” would be defined in future rulemaking with public comment, the bill provides, at a minimum, that the term include ransomware if it falls into one of six broad categories. The categories include ransomware involving a nation-state, an advanced persistent threat cyber actor, or a transnational organized crime group. The categories also include ransomware that results in or has the potential to result in harm to national security interests, the U.S. economy, or to public confidence, civil liberties, or public health and safety. In essence, it would encompass most types of ransomware.

The term “covered entity” also is to be defined by future rulemaking but, per the bill, “shall include, at a minimum, Federal contractors, owners or operators of critical infrastructure, as determined appropriate by the Director based on assessment of risks posed by compromise of critical infrastructure operation, and nongovernmental entities that provide cybersecurity incident response services.” CISA’s list of critical infrastructure sectors include: Information Technology, Communications, Healthcare and Public Health, Emergency Services, Financial, Energy, Food and Agriculture, Commercial Facilities, Critical Manufacturing, among others. For a full list of CISA’s current “critical infrastructure” sectors and a detailed description of each, click here

To incentivize compliance, the law would allow the CISA Director to assess a civil penalty up to 0.5 percent of the entity’s gross revenue from the prior year for each day it violates the requirements under the law or under rules promulgated under the law. The Director would be allowed to “take into account mitigating or aggravating factors, including the nature, circumstances, extent, and gravity of the violations and, with respect to the covered entity, the covered entity’s ability to pay, degree of culpability, and history of prior violations.”

Click here to read the full Senate Bill.