CISA/NCSC Joint Alert Warns of APT Groups Targeting Healthcare and Essential Services

by Margaret Young Levi and Kathie McDonald-McClure

On May 5, 2020, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA) and the United Kingdom’s National Cyber Security Centre (NCSC) issued a joint alert warning of techniques that advanced persistent threat (APT) groups are using to exploit the COVID-19 pandemic.

APT groups target and exploit organizations responding to COVID-19, such as healthcare organizations, pharmaceutical companies, universities, medical research organizations, and local governments. These groups seek to steal “bulk personal information, intellectual property, and intelligence that aligns with national priorities.” For example, pharmaceutical companies, medical research organizations, and universities have been targeted in order to steal sensitive research into COVID-19-related medicine for both commercial and governmental benefit.

These cybercriminals employ a variety of techniques to steal data.

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Data Security in the “New Normal” of Teleworking

By Margaret Young Levi and Kathie McDonald-McClure

The 2020 worldwide pandemic will go down in the history books much like the 1918 Spanish Flu.  One big difference between then and now: the technology that has enabled millions of us to remain moderately productive “at work” from the comfort of our homes.  Welcome to the “new normal” of telework.  Being comfy at work in yoga pants – saving time by not having to dress for “the office” as we once knew it.  Shorter commutes, with coffee refills only steps away in the “breakroom” – our kitchens.  Staying connected to our co-workers, clients and work associates in Brady Bunch style, creating a little mystique with virtual backgrounds on Zoom, Microsoft Teams or WebEx video conferencing platforms.

As relaxed as we may be in the new normal of teleworking, it’s not a time to relax when it comes to being vigilant in securing the confidences of our employers, employees, clients or customers.  Teleworking brings new technology challenges:  learning new software and conferencing programs, managing confidential paper documents, and protecting electronic data.  And since our homes are now an extension of our offices, these challenges may create additional exposure for employers. As office workers and healthcare providers switched to telework and telehealth under state stay-at-home orders, malicious cyber actors were ramping up to take advantage of the security gaps that would inevitably accompany such a sudden transition. Wyatt data privacy counsel offer practical tips to protect employer and client data, as well as personal information, in the new normal of telework.

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